About Hadogenes Phaeton

Hadogenes is an independent, self-initiated metaphysician with a great deal of experience in various Western mysteries and techniques, including Cartomancy, Geomancy, the Kabbalah, Hermeticism, and a number of other Renaissance traditions. He resides in his beloved Portland, Oregon, and enjoys exploring the nuances of urban metaphysics.

Thoughtforms: Theory and Psychospiritual Usage

Thoughtforms: Theory and Psychospiritual Usage

by Hadogenes Phaeton

I have failed at my attempts to create a golem, primarily for lack of trying. Following the directions in Aryeh Kaplan’s translation and commentary on the Sefer Yetzirah (1997, Samuel Weiser, Inc.), I attempted to complete the complex meditation on the 231 gates. It’s very complex, really. The practitioner must meditate upon the 22 letters of the Hebrew alef-bet surrounding him in a ring, and then slowly create and follow paths or “gates” between each of them in order. A golem is typically to be created only as a thought construct, and Kaplan explains that one was created as a physical entity only on the most special of occasions. The act of building a golem required great discipline, concentration, and visualization. The golem-builder needed to be righteous and spiritually pure, which requires quite a bit of work and effort on its own.

My attempt was part of a series of experiments I have been conducting on thoughtforms, which are an old and far-reaching idea in metaphysics. From a psychological standpoint, a thoughtform seems to be a compartmentalized part of the personality whose purpose is to complete a specific task, or perhaps a sub-personality which is created and embedded in the unconscious for a specific period of time. Of course, as with many metaphysical activities, a psychological approach doesn’t quite seem to explain the subjective changes that happen in the metaphysician’s situation. It might help to think of a thoughtform as a metaphysician’s “familiar spirit,” or perhaps like an imaginary friend for adults. This imaginary friend is, however, created with much deliberation and zeal.

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Invoking the King of Portland

Invoking the King of Portland

by

Hadogenes Phaeton

In my wanderings through my amazing city, I came upon an old craftsman bungalow in fine condition which seemed to be owned by fairly clean, creative, artistic types. The house was painted interesting colors, and in its front yard was a stylized throne wrapped in wire and glass baubles, about the size that a skinny kid could fit into, but not a grown adult. It stood on the walkway leading up to the house, looking out over the residential intersection as if surveying its domain. “Such a throne,” thought I, “would be fit for the King of Portland.” And then my imagination and intuition grasped onto this idea, which remained with me.

I imagined the King of Portland as a local deity, a god of a place, which is an old tradition springing probably from the animistic beliefs of so many of our early tribes and religions. Animism is the belief that inanimate objects can be spiritual beings. It is almost a type of monism, positing that there is no separation between the spiritual and the material. At times, when considering animism, I have been conscious of the strong pull of anthropomorphization, which can be a dangerous trap that leads the mind into misunderstanding all sorts of local phenomena, animals, and observations. But none of these notions kept the King of Portland from my mind.

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